Get in Shape for Your Wedding Day – Kim Kardashian wedding workout

Kim Kardashian WestKimberly “Kim” Kardashian West (born Kimberly Noel Kardashian, October 21, 1980) is an American television and social media personality, socialite, and model. Her father, Robert Kardashian, was known as a defense lawyer for her godfather, football player O. J. Simpson. Her step-father is Olympic decathlon gold medal winner Bruce Jenner. Born and raised in Los Angeles, California, Kardashian first gained media attention through her friendship with Paris Hilton, but she received wider notice after a 2003 sex tape with her former boyfriend Ray J was leaked in 2007.

Later that year, she and her family were commissioned to star in the reality television series Keeping Up with the Kardashians. Its success has led to the creation of spin-offs including Kourtney and Kim Take New York and Kourtney and Kim Take Miami. In 2010, Kardashian was reported to be the highest-paid reality television personality, with estimated earnings of $6 million.

In August 2011, Kardashian married basketball player Kris Humphries in a widely publicized ceremony. After 72 days of marriage, she filed for a divorce, which was finalized in June 2013 with an undisclosed settlement. The same month, Kardashian gave birth to a daughter, North West,[2] from her relationship with rapper Kanye West, which began in April 2012. Kardashian and West were married in May 2014.

Kim Kardashian is famous for her gorgeous looks and killer curves, including her equally as famous oh-so-photographed sculpted derriere.

While she can clearly thank mom and dad for those good genes, the reality starlet is working hard to keep her fabulous, bodacious body in check for her upcoming wedding to NBA player Kris Humphries this weekend.

Who can blame her? Tying the knot in front of a camera crew with all of America watching (as part of a four-hour wedding special airing on E! in October), along with a bevy of A-listers attending to boot is enough to make even the most confident bride-to-be want to log in some serious gym time.

With the help of her powerhouse trainer Gunnar Peterson, who’s been working with Kardashian to keep her figure fab for the last three years, there’s no question the stunning star will be looking va-va-voom amazing in her Vera Wang come August 20.

“I think the goal is to look her best like any bride (and groom for that matter!), and to be able to withstand the stress of a wedding,” Peterson says. “In her case a wedding that will be on the world’s stage!”

Peterson, who boasts a high-profile celebrity client roster including Sofia Vergara, Jennifer Lopez and Angelina Jolie, was inspired to become a personal trainer after being overweight as a kid.

kim-kardashian-bikini“I learned how to control it through exercise and later through diet,” the talented trainer says. “When I found out I could actually turn it into a ‘job’, it was a no-brainer. I still love it today, 23+ years later!”

So just how did the devoted, hard-working celebrity trainer get Kim K’s bridal bod in tip-top wedding shape? “Kim’s training is based on ‘if you stay ready you never have to get ready,’” Peterson says. “She grinds in the gym year round and makes the right choices outside of the gym so the payoff is increased.”

Peterson has been working with Kardashian 3 to 5 days per week, depending on the busy star’s schedule.  While her workouts were essentially the same as previous routines, they were a “little quicker paced”.

With all the buzz surrounding Kardashian’s upcoming nuptials, it’s no wonder why future brides from all over the world are finding inspiration for their big day in Peterson’s workouts.

“Don’t starve yourself. Try to get your rest so that your body can recover from your workouts, and so that your immune system is firing on all cylinders,” advises Peterson. “You don’t need to be rundown while you walk down the aisle!”

The good news is that you don’t have to be a blushing bride-to-be to benefit your body with Kim Kardashian’s wedding workout. Here, Peterson gives us the scoop on her fitness routine!

Source: http://www.shape.com/celebrities/celebrity-workouts/kim-kardashians-wedding-workout

 

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Candice Swanepoel (born 20 October 1988) is a South African model best known for her work with Victoria’s Secret. In 2012, she came in 10th on the Forbes top-earning models list.

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Anastasia Ashley Twerking Warm-Up Dance and Pro Surfer Full Workout

Quick Bio

Anastasia Ashley was born on February 10, 1987, in Los Angeles, California. After moving to Hawaii at the age of 5, Ashley was quickly introduced to what was to become her life’s calling: surfing. Despite being one of — it not the only — girl riding waves at the time, Ashley consistently proved that when it came to surfing, talent did not have a gender. A fact quickly reinforced by Anastasia becoming one of the most visible faces in the sport, as well as one of its most coveted athletes, landing sponsorships with Oakley, Infinity Surfboards, and PowerBar, and becoming one of PETA’s most prominent spokespeople.

Read more: http://au.askmen.com/celebs/interview_200/219_anastasia_ashley_interview.html#ixzz2bQUllU5T

Earlier today, this video surfaced of Anastasia Ashley engaging in the most enthusiastic warm-up routine we’ve seen in quite some time. It provoked a storm of feelings for us folks at SURFING Magazine, intrigue being one of them. We called Anastasia to get to the — well — bottom of this.

SURFING Magazine: Was the clip pre-meditated?

Anastasia Ashley: It wasn’t at all! I didn’t put out the video. I just woke up this morning with a bunch of people tweeting and texting me asking about it.

So you knew nothing about it?

No, I didn’t know anything until it was online. I tried reaching out to the people who put it up — it’s some blog or something — but I still haven’t figured out who was behind it. I really have no clue how it went down.

Is that just your normal pre-surf routine?

I always listen to music before I surf. Every contest, that’s kind of my warm-up routine. The one thing that the video doesn’t show is everything else that I do. I do stretches and other things, you know? I try to get loose and that’s just a part of it.

What’s the response to the video been like?

At first, I was kind of taken aback by it. But it’s all been pretty good for the most part. I definitely don’t want people to know me just for that. More than anything, I’m into surfing big waves. I got nominated for an XXL award last year and I’m really excited to keep pursuing that.

Do you do the same warm-up routine before you go surf big waves?

I mean, yeah. Listening to music is a big part of my pre-surf routine. And that’s just my way of warming up.

And we are perfectly OK with that.

http://www.surfingmagazine.com/news/anastasia-ashley-twerk-city-133/

http://www.anastasiaashley.com/

https://www.facebook.com/AnastasiaAshleyofficial

http://instagram.com/anastasiaashley

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Olivia Munn video with the Secrets to Her Smokin’ Bod

Lisa Olivia Munn is an American actress, comedian, model, television personality and author. She began her career as Lisa Munn. She has been using the name Olivia Munn since 2006 personally and professionally.

 

Magazine appearances

  • Maxim‘s Hot 100 Women, 2008 (#99)
  • Maxim‘s Hot 100 Women, 2009 (#96)
  • Maxim‘s Hot 100 Women, 2010 (#8)
  • Maxim‘s Hot 100 Women, 2011 (#2)
  • Maxim‘s Hot 100 Women, 2012 (#2)
  • FHM‘s 100 Sexiest Women of 2008 (#85)
  • FHM‘s 100 Sexiest Women of 2009 (#85)
  • FHM‘s 100 Sexiest Women of 2010 (#52)
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Dwayne Johnson “The Rock” Exclusive New Workout 2010

Dwayne Douglas Johnson born 2nd May , 1972, also known by his ring name The Rock, is an American actor and professional wrestler currently signed with WWE, primarily featured on its Raw brand. He is often credited as Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson.

The Rock Exclusive Workout

The Rock Training

 

Planning Strength and Speed Training For American Football

By Reggie Johal

American Football, like many other sports, has a history of coaches with a poor understanding of the sport’s demands inflicting upon players the necessity to run laps of the pitch, and engage in other forms of training at odds with the sport’s unique demands. With a constant stop start style to the play, with the average play lasting no longer than ten seconds, followed by a much longer rest period, its demands are closer to traditional sprinting and weight training methods, than sports such as Rugby or Boxing, where there is a much greater endurance element required. At the same time, the sport has a big element of lateral mobility and technical considerations to consider, absent from pure speed or strength sports.

This article will look at ways to incorporate speed and strength training methods to assist a player looking to improve his speed/strength during the football off-season. Each element will be considered individually. Given the wide range of requirements for the different positions in football, this article will focus on training planning for a typical week for Linebackers, Backs and Strong Safeties, although the advice is applicable to most positions except Kickers and Offensive/Defensive Linemen. Even then, many of the elements would remain broadly similar for these positions.

Strength Training

Most American Football players today will already place a large emphasis on strength training as this has been emphasized for a comparatively longer time in the sport due to the ever increasing demand for larger and stronger athletes. This does not mean that players should automatically follow the training advice handed out in bodybuilding magazines, or follow a generic college training program. Unfortunately, most college programs suffer from being overly simplistic due to the need to try to train 40 or 50 athletes at once in a facility. This type of training leads to the most simple, easy to administer programs being handed out to athletes, rather than the most effective. Similarly, athletes who believe bodybuilding programs can enhance sports performance may potentially gain some muscle size but at the expense often of relative strength and speed going down, as well as a decrease in joint mobility if emphasising single joint exercises. Additionally, bodybuilding programs’ emphasis on training to failure and exhaustive work on individual muscle groups will lead to less energy being available for the high intensity, explosive work which football demands.

Split Training vs Whole Body Training

Most players will often follow a typical bodybuilding protocol where individual muscle groups are trained once per week with very high volume. Unfortunately, while this may work under certain circumstances for bodybuilders, football players cannot afford to adopt this method. Most significantly, this method of training makes it very difficult to integrate training with the demands of improving other elements vital to success in football. For example, many bodybuilders will train back, quadriceps, hamstrings on separate days. This will mean for most of the time players will have insufficient energy to perform their other drills, sprint work etc due to excess muscular fatigue. Furthermore, split training will mean the central nervous system is always under stress from constantly performing high intensity activity leading to impaired recovery and ability to perform other drills outside the gym with the required intensity.

This leaves two options. The first is to adopt a lower/upper body split and the second is to adopt a full body training program. Both options have their advocates. Splitting the body into lower/upper will mean legs get trained twice a week meaning five days are left for rest. By only training legs on those two days, a greater volume of work can be performed on training days compared to a typical whole body approach consisting of hitting the weights on a Monday, Wednesday, Friday basis, where because of the increased frequency and need to train upper body as well, leg training volume would need to be reduced.

Depending on the athlete’s needs an upper/lower split is usually more useful for increasing strength and muscle size as many will struggle to maintain the intensity needed for a long, whole body training workout. A sample lower/upper body split would be as follows:

Sample Strength Training Split

Monday

Squats 4 x 4-6
Romanian Deadlifts 4 x 4-6
Step Ups 2 x 8
Pullthroughs 2 x 8
Ab Rollouts 2 x 8

Tuesday

Incline Bench Press 4 x 4
Hang Cleans 3 x 3
Shoulder Press 2 x 6
Pullups 2 x 6
Tricep Extensions 2 x 8
Barbell Curls 2 x 8

Thursday

Power Cleans 5 x 3
Snatch Grip Deadlifts 3 x 5
One Legged Squats 2 x 6
Glute Ham Raise 2 x 8
Hanging Leg Raises 2 x 10

Friday

Close Grip Bench Press 3 x 5
Pullups 3 x 5
Incline Dumbell Press 2 x 8
Seated Row Machine 2 x 8
Tricep Extensions 2 x 12
Dumbell Curls 2 x 12

Speed Training

Speed training for football players needs to consider the fact that football sprints are usually of much shorter duration than sprinting in track and field events. At the same time the body mechanics of football players will be different to those you see in top class sprinters.

Having said that, a speed training program for football players will have a large degree of overlap with that of Olympic athletes but with a limited requirement for the type of speed endurance work performed by sprinters during the summer track season. Instead a football program should primarily emphasise acceleration techniques with a smaller component of top speed work so that for the rare occasions that a full sprint is required, the player is able to maintain his top speed for longer.

Although there are many differing views on how to train speed, the approach used by Charlie Francis[i] is one which works well for integrating the other aspects of football training.

Speed Training Template for Off-Season

Monday

Warmup – 5 min general warmup
Mobility Exercises – 10 min
Running Drills – 10 min
Start Work – 6 x 10m (Practise a 3 point or 2 point stance and perform a maximal 10m sprint)
Acceleration Work – 6 x 20m (2 or 3 point stance and accelerate through to 20m)
Acceleration Work – 2 x 30m (Run from standing start to 30m)

Rest times between sprints should be 2-3 mins for 10m work, 3-5 min for 20m work, and 4-6 min for 30m work to ensure full recovery is attained.

The astute reader will notice the sprints are combined on a day where the weights pushed will be heavy. Depending on the athletes needs, they could sprint in the AM and do the weights in the evening or vice versa. Both approaches will work. The main factor behind placing sprints on the same day as weight training the legs is to allow for greater CNS and muscular recovery. Trying to sprint on separate days (e.g. on Tue) would mean the legs still being fatigued from the day before and then having less rest before the next weight session for legs. By contrast, combining weight training with leg work on the same day is something sprint coaches usually recommend.

Tuesday

Warmup – 5 min general warmup
Mobility Exercises – 10 min
Running Drills – 10 min
Tempo Work 8-10 x 100m @60-70% speed

Tempo training is running the distance at a sub-maximal speed and walking the next 100m. It is very important both for active recovery (recovering from the previous day’s exertions), learning to run in a relaxed manner (many athletes strain too much when sprinting maximally), and for overall conditioning and fat loss (the intervals being approximately similar when running/walking, as the work/rest time in football and in fat loss protocols such as Tabata).

Wednesday

With another high intensity day scheduled for Thursday, Wednesday is a time to rest and recuperate. Some mobility and drill work is okay for those who need it though.

Thursday

Warm-up – 5 min general warm-up
Mobility Exercises – 10 min
Running Drills – 10 min
Start Work – 6 x 10m (Practice a 3 point or 2 point stance and perform a maximal 10m sprint)
Acceleration – 3 x 20m
Acceleration – 3 x 30m
Top Speed – 3 x 50m

Thursday’s sprint training session is partnered with a relatively low load, explosive lifting weight training day. The sprint distances complement the weights by being of a greater distance and speed. This is the day when the football player will work his maximum speed but we keep acceleration work in, albeit at a reduced volume, as acceleration is a very important factor for football as well as helping to warmup the body for the top speed work. Rest times can be up to 10min long for the top speed sprints. The work conducted has to be of a high quality with full muscular and CNS recovery between sprints the aim of the athlete.

Friday

Tempo Work – 8-10 x 100m
This day is a repeat of Tuesday

Saturday

Warm-up – 5 min general warm-up
Mobility Exercises – 10 min
Running Drills – 10 min
Start Work – 4 x 10m (Practice a 3 point or 2 point stance and perform a maximal 10m sprint)
Acceleration – 3 x 20m
Acceleration – 2 x 30m
Top Speed – 2 x 50m
Top Speed – 2 x 60m

Saturday is the day when we should be at our freshest. There is no weight training prior to training and we are furthest removed from the draining effects of the heavy weight training conducted on Monday and Tuesday. There is a greater emphasis on top speed work this time with an increase in the distance up to 60m. This should be the time the athlete is setting his best times.

Sunday

Rest

Going Past a Week

At this point it should be pointed out that the approach given is for a sample training week in the off-season. Strength and speed training should still be periodized as normal. A favored approach of many programs is to gradually increase training volume and intensity before incorporating a week of reduced volume and intensity to allow for supercompensation and CNS recovery to take place. A 3/1 split of hard training followed by an easier “unloading” week will help promote continued improvements rather than trying to constantly add weight/sets/sprints to the program which will only lead to stagnation.

At the same time, other exercises and techniques will usually be incorporated to provide the athlete’s body with new challenges but the overall goal should remain the same which is to increase strength and speed over the long haul. Although it will be easy for a beginner to make rapid improvements in both strength and speed following a structure such as that outlined, at some point it is likely that either the weights or the speed work will have to be reduced in volume (although not intensity) and maintained so that the other quality being work can be emphasized.

Most 100m sprinters will usually go from a program where strength increases are emphasized in winter to one where weight training is restricted to maintenance only so that full attention can be devoted to maximal speed work during the summer months.

Of course, for American Football players, they may have a differing view on which element needs emphasizing but the fact remains that given that neither strength or speed improvements in-season are realistic, the player should look at his off-season training program and consider which variable he needs to work on the most. Then, he can perform a greater or lesser amount of speed or strength work as deemed appropriate by him and his coaching staff. For a strong athlete with limited speed this would mean reducing the volume of his weight work on his training days and training speed first in the training day, when the CNS and muscular system is freshest. On the other hand, a weak, fast athlete may wish to perform a limited amount of speed work and increase his weight training volume so that he can bring up his strength levels quicker.

Other Factors

Many other factors beyond how the athlete structures his training are important including mobility drills, nutritional support, supplementation, recovery and regeneration techniques, and technical work. Although these are beyond the scope of this article, each element should be implemented carefully. Please check the other articles at this site for further reading.

[i] The Charlie Francis Training System (1992)

Reggie Johal – http://www.Predatornutrition.com and Driven Sports
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Reggie_Johal
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